First Peoples

First Peoples Author Colin G. Calloway
ISBN-10 9781319120702
Year 2016-09-16
Pages
Language en
Publisher Macmillan Higher Education
DOWNLOAD NOW READ ONLINE

First Peoples was Bedford/St. Martin's first "docutext" - a textbook that features groups of primary source documents at the end of each chapter, essentially providing a reader in addition to the narrative textbook. Expertly authored by Colin G. Calloway, First Peoples has been praised for its inclusion of Native American sources and Calloway's concerted effort to weave Native perspectives throughout the narrative. First Peoples' distinctive approach continues to make it the bestselling and most highly acclaimed text for the American Indian history survey. Bedford Digital Collections for Native American History To give you more options for sources, we are offering five projects from the Bedford Digital Collections, bundled free with the purchase of a new text. This online repository of discovery-oriented projects offers both fresh and canonical sources ready to assign. Each curated project poses a historical question and guides students step by step through analysis of primary sources. Featuring: Pontiac's War, 1763-1765 Eric Hinderaker, University of Utah Building a Creek Nation: Reading the Letters of Alexander McGillivray Kathleen DuVal, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Debating Federal Indian Removal Policy in the 1830s John P. Bowes, Eastern Kentucky University Sand Creek: Battle or Massacre? Elliott West, University of Arkansas Fayetteville The Laguna Pueblo Baseball Game Controversy of the 1920s Flannery Burke, St. Louis University

First Peoples

First Peoples Author Colin G. Calloway
ISBN-10 9781319021573
Year 2015-09-04
Pages 720
Language en
Publisher Macmillan Higher Education
DOWNLOAD NOW READ ONLINE

First Peoples was Bedford/St. Martin’s first “docutext” – a textbook that features groups of primary source documents at the end of each chapter, essentially providing a reader in addition to the narrative textbook. Expertly authored by Colin G. Calloway, First Peoples has been praised for its inclusion of Native American sources and Calloway’s concerted effort to weave Native perspectives throughout the narrative. First Peoples’ distinctive approach continues to make it the bestselling and most highly acclaimed text for the American Indian history survey.

First Peoples

First Peoples Author Colin G. Calloway
ISBN-10 0312453736
Year 2008
Pages 655
Language en
Publisher Macmillan
DOWNLOAD NOW READ ONLINE

First Peoples distinctive approach to American Indian history has earned praise and admiration from its users. Created to fill the significant need for a survey text that acknowledges the diversity of Native peoples, respected scholar Colin G. Calloway provides a solid course foundation that still allows instructors to emphasize selected topics of interest to them and their students. The signature format of First Peoples strikes the ideal balance between primary and secondary source material, combining narrative, written documents, and visual documents in each chapter.

Rethinking American Indian History

Rethinking American Indian History Author Donald Lee Fixico
ISBN-10 0826318193
Year 1997
Pages 139
Language en
Publisher UNM Press
DOWNLOAD NOW READ ONLINE

Using innovative methodologies and theories to rethink American Indian history, this book challenges previous scholarship about Native Americans and their communities.

American Indian History

American Indian History Author Camilla Townsend
ISBN-10 9781405159074
Year 2009-04-20
Pages 247
Language en
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
DOWNLOAD NOW READ ONLINE

This Reader from the Uncovering the Past series provides a comprehensive introduction to American Indianhistory. Over 60 primary documents allow the voices of natives toilluminate the American past Includes samples of native languages just above the fulltranslations of particular texts Provides comprehensive introductions and headnotes, as well asimages, an extensive bibliography, and suggestions for furtherresearch Includes such texts as a decoded Maya inscription, letterswritten during the French and Indian War on the distribution ofsmall pox blankets, and a diatribe by General George ArmstrongCuster shortly before he was killed at the Battle of the Little BigHorn

The Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears

The Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears Author Theda Perdue
ISBN-10 9781101202340
Year 2007-07-05
Pages 208
Language en
Publisher Penguin
DOWNLOAD NOW READ ONLINE

Today, a fraction of the Cherokee people remains in their traditional homeland in the southern Appalachians. Most Cherokees were forcibly relocated to eastern Oklahoma in the early nineteenth century. In 1830 the U.S. government shifted its policy from one of trying to assimilate American Indians to one of relocating them and proceeded to drive seventeen thousand Cherokee people west of the Mississippi. The Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears recounts this moment in American history and considers its impact on the Cherokee, on U.S.-Indian relations, and on contemporary society. Guggenheim Fellowship-winning historian Theda Perdue and coauthor Michael D. Green explain the various and sometimes competing interests that resulted in the Cherokee?s expulsion, follow the exiles along the Trail of Tears, and chronicle their difficult years in the West after removal.

White People Indians and Highlanders

White People  Indians  and Highlanders Author Colin G. Calloway
ISBN-10 0199712891
Year 2008-07-03
Pages 392
Language en
Publisher Oxford University Press
DOWNLOAD NOW READ ONLINE

In nineteenth century paintings, the proud Indian warrior and the Scottish Highland chief appear in similar ways--colorful and wild, righteous and warlike, the last of their kind. Earlier accounts depict both as barbarians, lacking in culture and in need of civilization. By the nineteenth century, intermarriage and cultural contact between the two--described during the Seven Years' War as cousins--was such that Cree, Mohawk, Cherokee, and Salish were often spoken with Gaelic accents. In this imaginative work of imperial and tribal history, Colin Calloway examines why these two seemingly wildly disparate groups appear to have so much in common. Both Highland clans and Native American societies underwent parallel experiences on the peripheries of Britain's empire, and often encountered one another on the frontier. Indeed, Highlanders and American Indians fought, traded, and lived together. Both groups were treated as tribal peoples--remnants of a barbaric past--and eventually forced from their ancestral lands as their traditional food sources--cattle in the Highlands and bison on the Great Plains--were decimated to make way for livestock farming. In a familiar pattern, the cultures that conquered them would later romanticize the very ways of life they had destroyed. White People, Indians, and Highlanders illustrates how these groups alternately resisted and accommodated the cultural and economic assault of colonialism, before their eventual dispossession during the Highland Clearances and Indian Removals. What emerges is a finely-drawn portrait of how indigenous peoples with their own rich identities experienced cultural change, economic transformation, and demographic dislocation amidst the growing power of the British and American empires.

Spirit of the New England Tribes

Spirit of the New England Tribes Author William Scranton Simmons
ISBN-10 0874513723
Year 1986
Pages 331
Language en
Publisher UPNE
DOWNLOAD NOW READ ONLINE

Looks at how the folk tales of the Indians of New England have changed since they were first written down by early settlers

A Pipe for February

A Pipe for February Author Charles H. Red Corn
ISBN-10 0806137266
Year 2005-11-01
Pages 269
Language en
Publisher University of Oklahoma Press
DOWNLOAD NOW READ ONLINE

At the turn of the twentieth century, the Osage Indians were traditional tribal people who owned Oklahoma's most valuable oil reserves. During the 1920s, they became members of the wealthy oil population. Tracing the experiences of John Grayeagle, a young Osage, Charles Red Corn, describes the Osage experience of the 1920s.

Iroquois Diplomacy on the Early American Frontier

Iroquois Diplomacy on the Early American Frontier Author Timothy J. Shannon
ISBN-10 1440632650
Year 2008-07-03
Pages 272
Language en
Publisher Penguin
DOWNLOAD NOW READ ONLINE

The newest addition to the Penguin Library of American Indian History explores the most influential Native American Confederacy More than perhaps any other Native American group, the Iroquois found it to their advantage to interact with and adapt to white settlers. Despite being known as fierce warriors, the Iroquois were just as reliant on political prowess and sophisticated diplomacy to maintain their strategic position between New France and New York. Colonial observers marveled at what Benjamin Franklin called their "method of doing business" as Europeans learned to use Iroquois ceremonies and objects to remain in their good graces. Though the Iroquois negotiated with the colonial governments, they refused to be pawns of European empires, and their savvy kept them in control of much of the Northeast until the American Revolution. Iroquois Diplomacy and the Early American Frontier is a must-read for anyone fascinated by Native American history or interested in a unique perspective on the dawn of American government.

The Plains Sioux and U S Colonialism from Lewis and Clark to Wounded Knee

The Plains Sioux and U S  Colonialism from Lewis and Clark to Wounded Knee Author Jeffrey Ostler
ISBN-10 0521605903
Year 2004-07-05
Pages 387
Language en
Publisher Cambridge University Press
DOWNLOAD NOW READ ONLINE

This volume, first published in 2004, presents an overview of the history of the Plains Sioux as they became increasingly subject to the power of the United States in the 1800s. Many aspects of this story - the Oregon Trail, military clashes, the deaths of Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull, and the Ghost Dance - are well-known. Besides providing fresh insights into familiar events, the book offers an in-depth look at many lesser-known facets of Sioux history and culture. Drawing on theories of colonialism, the book shows how the Sioux creatively responded to the challenges of US expansion and domination, while at the same time revealing how US power increasingly limited the autonomy of Sioux communities as the century came to a close. The concluding chapters of the book offer a compelling reinterpretation of the events that led to the Wounded Knee massacre of December 29, 1890.

One Vast Winter Count

One Vast Winter Count Author Colin Gordon Calloway
ISBN-10 0803215304
Year 2003
Pages 631
Language en
Publisher U of Nebraska Press
DOWNLOAD NOW READ ONLINE

A professor of history offers a sweeping new history of the Native American West before the Lewis and Clarke expedition opened it to exploration, focusing particular attention on the period of conflict that preceded this period. (History)

Mixedblood Messages

Mixedblood Messages Author Louis Owens
ISBN-10 0806133813
Year 2001
Pages 263
Language en
Publisher University of Oklahoma Press
DOWNLOAD NOW READ ONLINE

In this challenging and often humorous book, Louis Owens examines issues of Indian identity and relationship to the environment as depicted in literature and film and as embodied in his own mixedblood roots in family and land. Powerful social and historical forces, he maintains, conspire to colonize literature and film by and about Native Americans into a safe "Indian Territory" that will contain and neutralize Indians. Countering this colonial "Territory" is what Owens defines as "Frontier," a dynamic, uncontainable, multi-directional space within which cultures meet and even merge. Owens offers new insights into the works of Indian writers ranging from John Rollin Ridge, Mourning Dove, and D'Arcy McNickle to N. Scott Momaday, Leslie Silko, James Welch, and Gerald Vizenor. In his analysis of Indians in film he scrutinizes distortions of Indians as victims or vanishing Americans in a series of John Wayne movies and in the politically correct but false gestures of the more recent Dances With Wolves. As Owens moves through his personal landscape in Oklahoma, Mississippi, California, and New Mexico, he questions how human beings collectively can alter their disastrous relationship with the natural world before they destroy it. He challenges all of us to articulate, through literature and other means, messages of personal and environmental — as well as cultural—survival, and to explore and share these messages by writing and reading across cultural boundaries.

This Indian Country

This Indian Country Author Frederick Hoxie
ISBN-10 9781101595909
Year 2012-10-25
Pages 496
Language en
Publisher Penguin
DOWNLOAD NOW READ ONLINE

Frederick E. Hoxie, one of our most prominent and celebrated academic historians of Native American history, has for years asked his undergraduate students at the beginning of each semester to write down the names of three American Indians. Almost without exception, year after year, the names are Geronimo, Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. The general conclusion is inescapable: Most Americans instinctively view Indians as people of the past who occupy a position outside the central narrative of American history. These three individuals were warriors, men who fought violently against American expansion, lost, and died. It’s taken as given that Native history has no particular relationship to what is conventionally presented as the story of America. Indians had a history too; but theirs was short and sad, and it ended a long time ago. In This Indian Country, Hoxie has created a bold and sweeping counter-narrative to our conventional understanding. Native American history, he argues, is also a story of political activism, its victories hard-won in courts and campaigns rather than on the battlefield. For more than two hundred years, Indian activists—some famous, many unknown beyond their own communities—have sought to bridge the distance between indigenous cultures and the republican democracy of the United States through legal and political debate. Over time their struggle defined a new language of “Indian rights” and created a vision of American Indian identity. In the process, they entered a dialogue with other activist movements, from African American civil rights to women’s rights and other progressive organizations. Hoxie weaves a powerful narrative that connects the individual to the tribe, the tribe to the nation, and the nation to broader historical processes. He asks readers to think deeply about how a country based on the values of liberty and equality managed to adapt to the complex cultural and political demands of people who refused to be overrun or ignored. As we grapple with contemporary challenges to national institutions, from inside and outside our borders, and as we reflect on the array of shifting national and cultural identities across the globe, This Indian Country provides a context and a language for understanding our present dilemmas.